Forest Soil Management

Working with the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Forest Resources Division, to provide relevant and up-to-date soil information and management implications to forest land managers in the form of both a practical field book and an interactive online document with links to additional sources of information

A Guide to Forest Soil Management: South Puget Sound Region, Snoqualmie Unit

Cole D. Gross

Introduction:

This guide was made to provide information about the soils and miscellaneous areas in the Snoqualmie Unit, which is located in the South Puget Sound Region in west-central Washington (Figure 1). The Snoqualmie Unit includes 54,644 acres of the broader Tiger Mountain and Mount Si area. Descriptions and topographic locations of the soils and miscellaneous areas are provided with a primary focus on their suitability, limitations, and management implications for forest land use. Among other sources, information was obtained from county and series soil surveys and the Web Soil Survey (Soil  Survey Staff) in order to provide relevant and up-to-date soil information. The sections in this report were created to best group and describe the many soils and miscellaneous areas in the Snoqualmie Unit. The most accurate description of the landscape was achieved using soil associations, which are groupings of geographically associated soils that often occur in a typical pattern across the landscape. Each soil association includes the main limitations and concerns affecting timber harvesting and production, management considerations, and a figure showing the pattern of soils and parent materials across the landscape.

Figure1_DNR map

Figure 1. Location of the South Puget Sound Region and the Snoqualmie Unit in Washington. The Snoqualmie Unit includes 54,644 acres of the broader Tiger Mountain and Mount Si area and is identified by colored blocks outlined in black (inset). The South Puget Sound Region covers King, Pierce, Kitsap, Mason, Thurston, and parts of Snohomish, Lewis and Grays Harbor counties. Sitting between the central Cascades and the Olympic Mountains, this region is divided in half by Puget Sound, Hood Canal, and Lake Washington and includes the Tahoma, Elbe Hills, Capitol, Tahuya and Tiger Mountain state forests. The region includes 359,524 acres of state forest, agriculture, urban, and conservation lands.

Figure modified from DNR maps

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